whitneymcn:

Sunday on Flickr.

2014, jack-o-lantern number one. Calling it a success.

Source: whitneymcn

Britons ask Google to delete 60,000 links under ‘right to be forgotten’ f

designculturemind:

Britons make third highest number of referrals in the EU behind French and Germans in wake of European court ruling

This is an interesting concept to compare with what our brains decide to forget and why. Rather, it would be interesting to apply the reasons certain memories in our brains are retained to deletion decisions for Google.

Source: designculturemind

ultrafacts:

gtxyphoenix:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow the Ultrafacts Blog!

Others are “Curiosity killed the cat, but satisfaction brought it back” and “The blood of the covenant is thicker than the water of the womb”

"Curiosity killed the cat but satisfaction brought it back":

Your curiosity can get you in a lot of trouble, but if you do go looking for an answer or what ever you were looking for,  your satisfaction of knowing was well worth the trouble that you went through to get it.

“The blood of the covenant is thicker than the water of the womb”:

Meaning that relationships formed by choice are stronger than those formed by birth.

Source: ultrafacts

eatpreydrug:

Interview with Hotshoe Magazine about EAT PREY DRUG 
Paul Kwiatkowski’s new online photography series Eat, Prey, Drug takes the viewer on a disorienting road-trip from the heavenly clouds of Mount Olympus to the dark, Hadean rivers of the underworld via America.  Along the way he derails the storied American road trip genre from it’s well trodden course of the diaristic photo-journal to multimedia internet experience encompassing photography, video and fiction.
Paul recently talked to Hotshoe about the inspirations behind the project and his desire to expand the traditional photo book narrative into an immersive internet experience.
Alan Knox: What first inspired you to follow photography?
Paul Kwiatkowski: I used to work in photojournalism as a multimedia producer prior to the recession, at the height of America’s invasion of Iraq. I remember that, for the first time, agents were selling camera phone images of the London bus bombing and screen shots of Saddam Hussein’s hanging. At the time, the only photographs making money were from the celebrity circle jerk surrounding Britney Spears, Paris Hilton and Anna Nicole Smith. That moment in Western history when photography exposed itself to annihilation was when I took interest. 
READ MORE HERE…..
ZoomInfo
eatpreydrug:

Interview with Hotshoe Magazine about EAT PREY DRUG 
Paul Kwiatkowski’s new online photography series Eat, Prey, Drug takes the viewer on a disorienting road-trip from the heavenly clouds of Mount Olympus to the dark, Hadean rivers of the underworld via America.  Along the way he derails the storied American road trip genre from it’s well trodden course of the diaristic photo-journal to multimedia internet experience encompassing photography, video and fiction.
Paul recently talked to Hotshoe about the inspirations behind the project and his desire to expand the traditional photo book narrative into an immersive internet experience.
Alan Knox: What first inspired you to follow photography?
Paul Kwiatkowski: I used to work in photojournalism as a multimedia producer prior to the recession, at the height of America’s invasion of Iraq. I remember that, for the first time, agents were selling camera phone images of the London bus bombing and screen shots of Saddam Hussein’s hanging. At the time, the only photographs making money were from the celebrity circle jerk surrounding Britney Spears, Paris Hilton and Anna Nicole Smith. That moment in Western history when photography exposed itself to annihilation was when I took interest. 
READ MORE HERE…..
ZoomInfo
eatpreydrug:

Interview with Hotshoe Magazine about EAT PREY DRUG 
Paul Kwiatkowski’s new online photography series Eat, Prey, Drug takes the viewer on a disorienting road-trip from the heavenly clouds of Mount Olympus to the dark, Hadean rivers of the underworld via America.  Along the way he derails the storied American road trip genre from it’s well trodden course of the diaristic photo-journal to multimedia internet experience encompassing photography, video and fiction.
Paul recently talked to Hotshoe about the inspirations behind the project and his desire to expand the traditional photo book narrative into an immersive internet experience.
Alan Knox: What first inspired you to follow photography?
Paul Kwiatkowski: I used to work in photojournalism as a multimedia producer prior to the recession, at the height of America’s invasion of Iraq. I remember that, for the first time, agents were selling camera phone images of the London bus bombing and screen shots of Saddam Hussein’s hanging. At the time, the only photographs making money were from the celebrity circle jerk surrounding Britney Spears, Paris Hilton and Anna Nicole Smith. That moment in Western history when photography exposed itself to annihilation was when I took interest. 
READ MORE HERE…..
ZoomInfo

eatpreydrug:

Interview with Hotshoe Magazine about EAT PREY DRUG 

Paul Kwiatkowski’s new online photography series Eat, Prey, Drug takes the viewer on a disorienting road-trip from the heavenly clouds of Mount Olympus to the dark, Hadean rivers of the underworld via America.  Along the way he derails the storied American road trip genre from it’s well trodden course of the diaristic photo-journal to multimedia internet experience encompassing photography, video and fiction.

Paul recently talked to Hotshoe about the inspirations behind the project and his desire to expand the traditional photo book narrative into an immersive internet experience.

Alan Knox: What first inspired you to follow photography?

Paul Kwiatkowski: I used to work in photojournalism as a multimedia producer prior to the recession, at the height of America’s invasion of Iraq. I remember that, for the first time, agents were selling camera phone images of the London bus bombing and screen shots of Saddam Hussein’s hanging. At the time, the only photographs making money were from the celebrity circle jerk surrounding Britney Spears, Paris Hilton and Anna Nicole Smith. That moment in Western history when photography exposed itself to annihilation was when I took interest. 

READ MORE HERE…..

(via toxicshock)

Source: eatpreydrug

gaywrites:

HUGE NEWS from the Supreme Court today! Marriage equality is on its way! (via Freedom to Marry)

Um, Utah?

(via thenewrepublic)

Source: freedomtomarry.org

humansofnewyork:

Little Humans is being released in 32.5 hours! Along with an award-winning* narrative, it’s got 37 of the best kids photos from the last 4 years of HONY. Guaranteed to produce scream-smiles of the variety seen below. You can preorder now online for 50% off. 

AMAZON: http://amzn.to/WPMamU
BARNES AND NOBLE: http://bit.ly/1eawvWE
INDIEBOUND: http://bit.ly/1zA0Sw6

*The Susie The Dog Award for best kids book written by her dad.

Source: humansofnewyork

hydeordie:

Self portrait in a Mary Corse

Shadow Self-Portraits!

Source: hydeordie

Who just watched the USC-ASU football game? 

Incredible.

littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Dynamic Fluid Art of Pat Steir
In the 1980s Steir developed a technique that involved applying paint exclusively by dripping and flinging it onto the canvas. Despite the freedom of execution and the large areas of canvas to be addressed, Steir exercises expert control over her methods, which she developed in part through in-depth study of Japanese and Chinese painting. The pouring process also evokes comparison with the work of Jackson Pollock—but rather than painting on the floor, Steir works from a ladder on unstretched canvas tacked to the wall, pouring and flinging paint, water, or solvent from oversaturated brushes and allowing the fluid media to cascade down the length of the support. As she has explained, “the paint itself makes the picture…. Gravity makes the image.” Txt Met Museum
” And these waterfalls are more of the monoprint series. The grid is drawn later. The blue, gold and white were printed, and then I poured paint over it and drew the grid over that. These shapes are like ghosts. I just wait in front of the thing before I either throw the paint or make the mark. If I have to sit in a chair and wait there every day for months, I do it.”  Txt Bomb Magazine
ZoomInfo
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Dynamic Fluid Art of Pat Steir
In the 1980s Steir developed a technique that involved applying paint exclusively by dripping and flinging it onto the canvas. Despite the freedom of execution and the large areas of canvas to be addressed, Steir exercises expert control over her methods, which she developed in part through in-depth study of Japanese and Chinese painting. The pouring process also evokes comparison with the work of Jackson Pollock—but rather than painting on the floor, Steir works from a ladder on unstretched canvas tacked to the wall, pouring and flinging paint, water, or solvent from oversaturated brushes and allowing the fluid media to cascade down the length of the support. As she has explained, “the paint itself makes the picture…. Gravity makes the image.” Txt Met Museum
” And these waterfalls are more of the monoprint series. The grid is drawn later. The blue, gold and white were printed, and then I poured paint over it and drew the grid over that. These shapes are like ghosts. I just wait in front of the thing before I either throw the paint or make the mark. If I have to sit in a chair and wait there every day for months, I do it.”  Txt Bomb Magazine
ZoomInfo
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Dynamic Fluid Art of Pat Steir
In the 1980s Steir developed a technique that involved applying paint exclusively by dripping and flinging it onto the canvas. Despite the freedom of execution and the large areas of canvas to be addressed, Steir exercises expert control over her methods, which she developed in part through in-depth study of Japanese and Chinese painting. The pouring process also evokes comparison with the work of Jackson Pollock—but rather than painting on the floor, Steir works from a ladder on unstretched canvas tacked to the wall, pouring and flinging paint, water, or solvent from oversaturated brushes and allowing the fluid media to cascade down the length of the support. As she has explained, “the paint itself makes the picture…. Gravity makes the image.” Txt Met Museum
” And these waterfalls are more of the monoprint series. The grid is drawn later. The blue, gold and white were printed, and then I poured paint over it and drew the grid over that. These shapes are like ghosts. I just wait in front of the thing before I either throw the paint or make the mark. If I have to sit in a chair and wait there every day for months, I do it.”  Txt Bomb Magazine
ZoomInfo
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Dynamic Fluid Art of Pat Steir
In the 1980s Steir developed a technique that involved applying paint exclusively by dripping and flinging it onto the canvas. Despite the freedom of execution and the large areas of canvas to be addressed, Steir exercises expert control over her methods, which she developed in part through in-depth study of Japanese and Chinese painting. The pouring process also evokes comparison with the work of Jackson Pollock—but rather than painting on the floor, Steir works from a ladder on unstretched canvas tacked to the wall, pouring and flinging paint, water, or solvent from oversaturated brushes and allowing the fluid media to cascade down the length of the support. As she has explained, “the paint itself makes the picture…. Gravity makes the image.” Txt Met Museum
” And these waterfalls are more of the monoprint series. The grid is drawn later. The blue, gold and white were printed, and then I poured paint over it and drew the grid over that. These shapes are like ghosts. I just wait in front of the thing before I either throw the paint or make the mark. If I have to sit in a chair and wait there every day for months, I do it.”  Txt Bomb Magazine
ZoomInfo
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Dynamic Fluid Art of Pat Steir
In the 1980s Steir developed a technique that involved applying paint exclusively by dripping and flinging it onto the canvas. Despite the freedom of execution and the large areas of canvas to be addressed, Steir exercises expert control over her methods, which she developed in part through in-depth study of Japanese and Chinese painting. The pouring process also evokes comparison with the work of Jackson Pollock—but rather than painting on the floor, Steir works from a ladder on unstretched canvas tacked to the wall, pouring and flinging paint, water, or solvent from oversaturated brushes and allowing the fluid media to cascade down the length of the support. As she has explained, “the paint itself makes the picture…. Gravity makes the image.” Txt Met Museum
” And these waterfalls are more of the monoprint series. The grid is drawn later. The blue, gold and white were printed, and then I poured paint over it and drew the grid over that. These shapes are like ghosts. I just wait in front of the thing before I either throw the paint or make the mark. If I have to sit in a chair and wait there every day for months, I do it.”  Txt Bomb Magazine
ZoomInfo
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Dynamic Fluid Art of Pat Steir
In the 1980s Steir developed a technique that involved applying paint exclusively by dripping and flinging it onto the canvas. Despite the freedom of execution and the large areas of canvas to be addressed, Steir exercises expert control over her methods, which she developed in part through in-depth study of Japanese and Chinese painting. The pouring process also evokes comparison with the work of Jackson Pollock—but rather than painting on the floor, Steir works from a ladder on unstretched canvas tacked to the wall, pouring and flinging paint, water, or solvent from oversaturated brushes and allowing the fluid media to cascade down the length of the support. As she has explained, “the paint itself makes the picture…. Gravity makes the image.” Txt Met Museum
” And these waterfalls are more of the monoprint series. The grid is drawn later. The blue, gold and white were printed, and then I poured paint over it and drew the grid over that. These shapes are like ghosts. I just wait in front of the thing before I either throw the paint or make the mark. If I have to sit in a chair and wait there every day for months, I do it.”  Txt Bomb Magazine
ZoomInfo
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Dynamic Fluid Art of Pat Steir
In the 1980s Steir developed a technique that involved applying paint exclusively by dripping and flinging it onto the canvas. Despite the freedom of execution and the large areas of canvas to be addressed, Steir exercises expert control over her methods, which she developed in part through in-depth study of Japanese and Chinese painting. The pouring process also evokes comparison with the work of Jackson Pollock—but rather than painting on the floor, Steir works from a ladder on unstretched canvas tacked to the wall, pouring and flinging paint, water, or solvent from oversaturated brushes and allowing the fluid media to cascade down the length of the support. As she has explained, “the paint itself makes the picture…. Gravity makes the image.” Txt Met Museum
” And these waterfalls are more of the monoprint series. The grid is drawn later. The blue, gold and white were printed, and then I poured paint over it and drew the grid over that. These shapes are like ghosts. I just wait in front of the thing before I either throw the paint or make the mark. If I have to sit in a chair and wait there every day for months, I do it.”  Txt Bomb Magazine
ZoomInfo
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Dynamic Fluid Art of Pat Steir
In the 1980s Steir developed a technique that involved applying paint exclusively by dripping and flinging it onto the canvas. Despite the freedom of execution and the large areas of canvas to be addressed, Steir exercises expert control over her methods, which she developed in part through in-depth study of Japanese and Chinese painting. The pouring process also evokes comparison with the work of Jackson Pollock—but rather than painting on the floor, Steir works from a ladder on unstretched canvas tacked to the wall, pouring and flinging paint, water, or solvent from oversaturated brushes and allowing the fluid media to cascade down the length of the support. As she has explained, “the paint itself makes the picture…. Gravity makes the image.” Txt Met Museum
” And these waterfalls are more of the monoprint series. The grid is drawn later. The blue, gold and white were printed, and then I poured paint over it and drew the grid over that. These shapes are like ghosts. I just wait in front of the thing before I either throw the paint or make the mark. If I have to sit in a chair and wait there every day for months, I do it.”  Txt Bomb Magazine
ZoomInfo
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Dynamic Fluid Art of Pat Steir
In the 1980s Steir developed a technique that involved applying paint exclusively by dripping and flinging it onto the canvas. Despite the freedom of execution and the large areas of canvas to be addressed, Steir exercises expert control over her methods, which she developed in part through in-depth study of Japanese and Chinese painting. The pouring process also evokes comparison with the work of Jackson Pollock—but rather than painting on the floor, Steir works from a ladder on unstretched canvas tacked to the wall, pouring and flinging paint, water, or solvent from oversaturated brushes and allowing the fluid media to cascade down the length of the support. As she has explained, “the paint itself makes the picture…. Gravity makes the image.” Txt Met Museum
” And these waterfalls are more of the monoprint series. The grid is drawn later. The blue, gold and white were printed, and then I poured paint over it and drew the grid over that. These shapes are like ghosts. I just wait in front of the thing before I either throw the paint or make the mark. If I have to sit in a chair and wait there every day for months, I do it.”  Txt Bomb Magazine
ZoomInfo
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Dynamic Fluid Art of Pat Steir
In the 1980s Steir developed a technique that involved applying paint exclusively by dripping and flinging it onto the canvas. Despite the freedom of execution and the large areas of canvas to be addressed, Steir exercises expert control over her methods, which she developed in part through in-depth study of Japanese and Chinese painting. The pouring process also evokes comparison with the work of Jackson Pollock—but rather than painting on the floor, Steir works from a ladder on unstretched canvas tacked to the wall, pouring and flinging paint, water, or solvent from oversaturated brushes and allowing the fluid media to cascade down the length of the support. As she has explained, “the paint itself makes the picture…. Gravity makes the image.” Txt Met Museum
” And these waterfalls are more of the monoprint series. The grid is drawn later. The blue, gold and white were printed, and then I poured paint over it and drew the grid over that. These shapes are like ghosts. I just wait in front of the thing before I either throw the paint or make the mark. If I have to sit in a chair and wait there every day for months, I do it.”  Txt Bomb Magazine
ZoomInfo

littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Dynamic Fluid Art of Pat Steir

In the 1980s Steir developed a technique that involved applying paint exclusively by dripping and flinging it onto the canvas. Despite the freedom of execution and the large areas of canvas to be addressed, Steir exercises expert control over her methods, which she developed in part through in-depth study of Japanese and Chinese painting. The pouring process also evokes comparison with the work of Jackson Pollock—but rather than painting on the floor, Steir works from a ladder on unstretched canvas tacked to the wall, pouring and flinging paint, water, or solvent from oversaturated brushes and allowing the fluid media to cascade down the length of the support. As she has explained, “the paint itself makes the picture…. Gravity makes the image.” Txt Met Museum

” And these waterfalls are more of the monoprint series. The grid is drawn later. The blue, gold and white were printed, and then I poured paint over it and drew the grid over that. These shapes are like ghosts. I just wait in front of the thing before I either throw the paint or make the mark. If I have to sit in a chair and wait there every day for months, I do it.”  Txt Bomb Magazine

(via markschoneveld)

Source: littlelimpstiff14u2

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